Libraries land new film, arts, and human-rights collection

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Preserve and Protect

When Terry Anderson, the chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, was kidnapped in Beirut in 1985 and held hostage for nearly seven years, the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ) lobbied hard for his release. And when Cameroonian newspaper editor Germain Cyrille Ngota Ngota died while in pretrial detention this past April, CPJ pressed Cameroon’s president for an impartial inquiry.

Since its founding in 1981, CPJ has saved documents, photographs, clippings, and correspondence pertaining to many such cases. Now CPJ has donated its archive to Columbia, where it becomes part of the Center for Human Rights Documentation and Research, which already holds the archives of Amnesty International USA, the Committee of Concerned Scientists, Human Rights First, and Human Rights Watch.

“This is a record of our own history,” says CPJ executive director Joel Simon, “but it is also a history of a global movement that has emerged in the last couple of decades: the press-freedom movement, which is intimately connected to the humanrights movement.”

 

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