Afterwords

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By the late popular philosopher Will Durant 1917GSAS, from Fallen Leaves: Last Words on Life, Love, War, and God, which was discovered in manuscript thirty-two years after Durant’s 1981 death and published in 2014.


In the end we must steel ourselves against utopias and be content, as Aristotle recommended, with a slightly better state. We must not expect the world to improve much faster than ourselves. Perhaps, if we can broaden our borders with intelligent study, impartial histories, modest travel, and honest thought — if we can become conscious of the needs and views and hopes of other peoples, and sensitive to the diverse values and beauties of diverse cultures and lands, we shall not so readily plunge into competitive homicide, but shall find room in our hearts for a wider understanding and an almost universal sympathy. We shall find in all nations qualities and accomplishments from which we may learn and refresh ourselves, and by which we may enrich our inheritance and our posterity. Some day, let us hope, it will be permitted us to love our country without betraying mankind. 

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